Remember This: Holiday Glitter Plaques

Dorri Partain
Northeast News

Whether hung on a door, a wall, or in a window, these bright-colored decorations were a holiday staple for several decades.

Proudly made in the U.S.A. by the Kage Company of Manchester, Conneticutt, they had a bumpy texture that earned them the nickname “popcorn decorations.”

The manufacturer, however, marketed their variety of styles as “Glitter Plaques.” Despite never containing any glitter in their composition, the plastic chips were shiny and caught light, giving the surface a glittering effect.

The plastic “chips” were actually polyethylene pellets used to make envelopes and bank passbooks, which composed Kage Company’s main line of products.

Company owner Kibbe Gerstein had taken home a box of colorful pellet samples, which his young daughter Elaine put to an alternate use.

Home from school one day due to illness, she had taken the pellets and crafted a picture of a chicken.

When Gerstein come home from work, they transferred the design to a baking sheet and popped it into the oven.

After baking 10 minutes, the pellets had melted enough to join together while creating a bumpy texture.

On a whim, he took his daughter’s design with him to a trade show and ended up with an order for 25,000 plaques from the W.T. Grant Co., a popular department store at that time.

Gerstein created molds for additional designs, which helped hold the shape during baking and showed placement for the different colored sections.

Glitter Plaques were produced for all the major holidays: Halloween, Christmas, Easter, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day.

Thanksgiving designs included a turkey, boy and girl pilgrims, and boy and girl Native Americans.

Along with multiple styles of santas and rudolphs, Kage also offered designs of popular cartoon characters, including Snoopy, Smokey The Bear, Betty Boop, and Warner Brothers Looney Tunes.

Approximately 200 different styles of Glitter Plaques were offered from the late 1960s through 2008, when the manufacturer ceased production.

Want Northeast News articles sent straight to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
Enter your email address and click on the Get Instant Access button.
We respect your privacy

Comments are closed.

  • Batter up!

    February 19th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week, our tour of Negro League stadiums brings us to Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Named […]


    Remember This: Glass food storage

    February 19th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor As homemakers embraced electric refrigerators, first introduced for home use in 1927, they were now able to […]


    REMEMBER THIS? Stockpiled provisions

    February 12th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News In the event of a nuclear attack on American soil, can citizens survive on a diet […]


    Ponce de Leon Park, home to the Atlanta Black Crackers

    February 12th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week we make a stop in Atlanta, Georgia for a look at the iconic Ponce de […]


    Negro American League Spotlight: Crosley Field, home of the Cincinnati Reds

    February 5th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week we stop by Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio, long-time home of the Cincinnati Reds, the […]


  • Remember This? Mugs Up

    February 5th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Got a nickel in your pocket?   Then head over to the closest Mugs Up Root Beer stand, […]


    Many teams played at Municipal Stadium

    January 29th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Located at 22nd and Brooklyn, Municipal Stadium was the home to many professional sports teams long […]


    REMEMBER THIS? Chiefs 1970 Season

    January 29th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News The Kansas City Chiefs first played a championship game in 1966, losing to the Green Bay […]


    Before merger, Kansas City phoned Home

    January 22nd, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Kansas City was serviced by two telephone companies when the North American Postcard Publishing Company printed […]


    Remember This? Rotary phone

    January 22nd, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News Even without dials, we still “dial” a number when making a telephone call. When inventor Alexander […]


  • Faces Of Northeast


  • Remember This?


  • retorts illustrated by bryan stalder


  • Want articles sent directly to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
    We respect your privacy and will not distribute your information.