Neighborhood school built on history

garfield.tif

Photo of WWI Veterans plaque by David Remley

pc.tif

 

By MICHAEL BUSHNELL
Northeast News
August 14, 2013

Located on the corner of Prospect Boulevard and Amie Court, Garfield Elementary School was one of the first ward schools in Kansas City.

The imposing red brick building bore the address of 421 Wabash St. and was erected in 1884, complete with a bell tower.

In 1909, the building was extensively remodeled. New entrances were built, the bell tower was removed, and a new lunchroom was added in the building’s basement. Garfield was actually the first Kansas City school to have facilities for student lunches.

Garfield’s first principal was the colorful Charles Thompson, who, in an earlier life, was an Indian fighter in Kansas and Iowa. After 11 years at Garfield, Thompson, known as one of the best mathematicians in the city, went on to serve as Northeast High School’s principal. M.J. Patterson succeeded Thompson as principal of Garfield.

A number of notable Kansas Citians attended Garfield, including baseball great Charles Dillon “Casey” Stengel, David Beals Jr., George Conover (Conover Steel) and Frank Hicks, Knuckleheads Saloon (FOG Cycles) owner.

The stately structure was razed in 1961, and a new Garfield Elementary School was constructed on the site. Prior to its razing, a group of more than 400 Garfield alumni gathered to take a last tour and share memories of the “old Garfield.”

A bronze relief dedicated to Garfield’s WW I veterans was salvaged from the old building and now graces the west hallway at the neighborhood school. The plaque, erected to honor “Our World War Heroes,” was built into the old school after WWI and pays homage to the 213 Garfield School alumni who died during the war. Six names are highlighted above the 207 others for receiving special commendations from the army. Those names are Murray Davis, James J. Swafford, Robert McClellande Simpson, Amos Johnson, Harry Felton and Stanley Wood.

 

Comments are closed.

  • Cemetery vaults held waiting bodies in historic cemetery

    November 30th, 2016
    by

    By MICHAEL BUSHNELL Northeast News November 30, 2016 In 1888 when the Forest Hill Cemetery was incorporated, it lay outside […]


    Americans give thanks nearly 400 years

    November 23rd, 2016
    by

    By MICHAEL BUSHNELL Northeast News November 23, 2016 What we celebrate as Thanksgiving is traditionally tied to a three-day feast […]


    Polished beauty rode the rails

    November 16th, 2016
    by

    Billed as the first streamlined diesel-powered train between St. Louis and Kansas City, the Alton Burlington, Ozark State Zephyr graces the front of this linen era postcard sent to Meyer Supply Company of St. Louis on Feb 23, 1937. Built entirely of stainless steel, the train was the flagship of Burlington Railway…


    Iconic igloo inspires museum memories

    November 9th, 2016
    by

    If you’ve forgotten what the third floor of the Kansas City Museum looked like when your elementary school booked a field trip there, here’s a little refresher for you…


    When the center isn’t really the center

    November 2nd, 2016
    by

    Depending on whom you ask, the geographic center of the United States could be one of four different places, all in various midwestern states.


  • Halloween’s chilling origins

    October 26th, 2016
    by

    By MICHAEL BUSHNELL Northeast News October 26, 2016 Halloween traces its origins to the ancient Celtic holiday “Samhain” (pronounced “sow-in”), […]


    Missouri army camp trained celebrities

    October 19th, 2016
    by

    Northeast News Camp Crowder in Neosho, originally established as an Army Signal Corps training camp, was made famous by a variety of celebrities who spent time there during World War..


    P&L building lights up KC

    October 12th, 2016
    by

    By MICHAEL BUSHNELL Northeast News October 12, 2016 Arguably one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture in the […]


    A royal treat since 1899

    September 27th, 2016
    by

    Northeast News The roots of today’s American Royal can be traced to 1899 when the fledgling event was referred to as the National Hereford Show.


    Swope mystery lives on while park thrives

    September 20th, 2016
    by

    Northeast News This card, titled “Entrance to Swope Park, Kansas City,” may have been sent by a prominent Kansas City architect of its day.


  • Local Weather

  • What’s Happening

    KCPS gets chance to impress DESE with James Elementary tour

    By Paul Thompson Northeast News December 1, 2016 KANSAS CITY, Missouri – James Elementary was one of three buildings in […]

    Mural installation at Scarritt Elementary almost finished

    By Michael Bushnell Northeast News December 1, 2016 KANSAS CITY, Missouri – The Northeast News caught up with Kansas City […]

    Robbery suspect dies after officer-involved shooting

    By Paul Thompson Northeast News November 30, 2016 KANSAS CITY, Missouri – A Kansas City, Missouri police officer shot and […]