REMEMBER THIS? Ink Blotter

Dorri Partain
Northeast News

A handy companion to the fountain pen, the ink blotter prevented smears and blotches that often occurred while waiting for the ink to dry. Paper manufacturer Joseph Parker discovered a softer paper was absorbent, and began marketing blotter paper in 1856. Soon after, businesses could have their advertisement printed and attached to blotter paper, making a useful business card that could be used over and over by their customers.

This blotter card also features a calendar from March 1941, and was offered by Chandler Flowers (101 W. 47th) to promote their shop on the Country Club Plaza. Founder and president Clarence A. Chandler opened the shop in 1916, a few years before J.C. Nichols began buying lots in the area. Chandler also owned and operated a large nursery, that not only provided flowers and plants for the Plaza shop, but offered 160 acres of trees, evergreens, and shrubs at 95th and Mission Road, where he also had his estate.

Chandler retired and sold the shop in 1958. Afterward, the flower shop was demolished to make way for a new ladies’ fashion shop, the popular Swanson’s. Chandler died in 1963, and in his honor, J.C. Nichols built and dedicated Chandler Court in 1967. The courtyard features the fountain of Bacchus and a plaque that reads: Chandler Court 1967, In memory of Clarence A. Chandler 1872-1963, Pioneer florist and original owner of the first commercial structure to occupy this site.

The Cheesecake Factory now occupies the old Swanson’s building at 47th Street and Wyandotte Street.

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