REMEMBER THIS? Coca-cola

Dorri Partain
Northeast News

If you’re thirsty after that long drive from Kingman to Barstow that takes you through the Mojave Desert, you might be searching for the familiar red and white cooler emblazoned with these words: “Drink Coca-Cola.”

When inventor John S. Pemberton invented Coca-Cola in 1886, it was only available at drug store soda fountains. Based on the French drink called coca wine, it indeed included cocaine as a major ingredient. In developing his recipe, he substituted the wine with a kola nut extract and the popular result wasn’t modified until 1903. Traces of cocaine remained until the recipe was modified again in 1929.

Coca-Cola became portable in 1915, when the contoured-glass bottle was developed. Consumers could purchase bottles for home consumption, picnics, and other occasions, but chilled bottles didn’t become readily available until the company had Glascock Brothers, a sheet metal manufacturer, design a four-legged cabinet that held ice in 1929. This design had its drawbacks, namely, that the ice had to be replaced as it melted, and cashiers had to keep an eye on who was taking bottles and if they were paying their nickel.

By 1934, Westinghouse had developed an electric cooling system which circulated cold water to chill glass bottles to “ice cold.” The new design could hold 3 to 6 cases of soda without being refilled constantly or replenishing ice, but cashiers still had to collect the money. The same chest design was modified two years later so that the cooling system did not require water. Any business owner, whether it was a gas station, grocery, or motel, that had floor space and an electric outlet could offer cold drinks.

The cooler also had a bottle opener, cap catcher, and usually a wooden crate to hold empty bottles. Since bottles only held 6 or 10 ounces, you could pay for your Coke, drink it down, and get back on the road.

Want Northeast News articles sent straight to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
Enter your email address and click on the Get Instant Access button.
We respect your privacy

Comments are closed.

  • Batter up!

    February 19th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week, our tour of Negro League stadiums brings us to Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Named […]


    Remember This: Glass food storage

    February 19th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor As homemakers embraced electric refrigerators, first introduced for home use in 1927, they were now able to […]


    REMEMBER THIS? Stockpiled provisions

    February 12th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News In the event of a nuclear attack on American soil, can citizens survive on a diet […]


    Ponce de Leon Park, home to the Atlanta Black Crackers

    February 12th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week we make a stop in Atlanta, Georgia for a look at the iconic Ponce de […]


    Negro American League Spotlight: Crosley Field, home of the Cincinnati Reds

    February 5th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week we stop by Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio, long-time home of the Cincinnati Reds, the […]


  • Remember This? Mugs Up

    February 5th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Got a nickel in your pocket?   Then head over to the closest Mugs Up Root Beer stand, […]


    REMEMBER THIS? Chiefs 1970 Season

    January 29th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News The Kansas City Chiefs first played a championship game in 1966, losing to the Green Bay […]


    Many teams played at Municipal Stadium

    January 29th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Located at 22nd and Brooklyn, Municipal Stadium was the home to many professional sports teams long […]


    Remember This? Rotary phone

    January 22nd, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Northeast News Even without dials, we still “dial” a number when making a telephone call. When inventor Alexander […]


    Before merger, Kansas City phoned Home

    January 22nd, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Kansas City was serviced by two telephone companies when the North American Postcard Publishing Company printed […]


  • Faces Of Northeast


  • Remember This?


  • retorts illustrated by bryan stalder


  • Want articles sent directly to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
    We respect your privacy and will not distribute your information.