Armour mansion an 1800s wonder

Michael Bushnell
Northeast News

When Kirkland B. Armour began construction of his palatial mansion on the boulevard that bears the name of his uncle, Simeon B. Armour, the roadway was barely more than a widened city street.

This hand-colored postcard published “expressly for S. H. Knox & Co.” of Kansas City shows a time when the road was still covered with macadam and lined with newly planted Dutch Elm trees.

Armour was president of the Armour Brothers Packing House — one of the many meat-packing houses located in the West Bottoms between Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan. When the mansion was completed, the street still was known as Commonwealth Avenue. It was not changed to Armour Boulevard until early in the 1900s following the adoption of City Planner George Kessler’s forward-thinking plan that ultimately became Kansas City’s parks and boulevards system.

In typical Armour style, the house was the largest and most architecturally significant of the many mansions once located along Armour Boulevard stretching between Broadway and The Paseo.

In the 1890s, Armour, along with his brother Charles, purchased roughly 1,000 acres of farmland near what is now Meyer Circle and began buying exotic breeds of cattle that once comprised the Queen’s Herd in Great Britain.

After Armour’s death in 1901, the home was used as a school by an order of French nuns named Notre Dame de Sion.

Sadly, the home and its great stable were razed in the 1950s to make way for a modern office building once occupied by the Standard Oil Company. No evidence of the house or the stable exists today.

Want Northeast News articles sent straight to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
Enter your email address and click on the Get Instant Access button.
We respect your privacy

Comments are closed.

  • Author Poe lives on through this literary postcard

    18 hours ago
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News This Halloween, we depart from our traditional jack-o-lantern or witching-style postcard and offer this literary postcard […]


    A royal treat since 1899

    October 16th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News The roots of today’s American Royal can be traced to 1899 when the fledgling event was […]


    Dodge flashes ahead in style with the 1955 Dodge Royal Lancer

    October 9th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Advertising postcards such as these were used widely by automobile dealers from the early 1920s through […]


    Taming the streets of Kansas City

    October 2nd, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Print advertisements placed by the Oldsmobile Company in 1939 tout the new Olds “60” as the […]


    Those were some postcards! (And that’s no exaggeration)

    September 25th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News William H. “Dad” Martin of Ottawa, Kansas, is considered to be the father of the exaggerated […]


  • Burgers and Bowling

    September 18th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Today is National Cheeseburger Day! With that, we acknowledge that some of the best burgers can […]


    National Cheeseburger Day is just around the “Corner”

    September 11th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News It’s that time of year again! Time to celebrate the all-American Cheeseburger. Just like last year, […]


    At the end of the road

    September 4th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Santa Monica Pier, home of the Santa Monica Auto Camp, at 1617 Ocean Avenue, one block […]


    San Bernardino, CA

    August 28th, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News At 295 North E. Street in the heart of downtown San Bernardino, California, once stood the […]


    Are we there yet?

    August 21st, 2019
    by

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News Checking out of the old White Rock Court, we continue our westward trek as Route 66 […]


  • Faces Of Northeast


  • Postcard

    Kingman, AZ

    August 14th, 2019
    by

  • retorts illustrated by bryan stalder


  • Want articles sent directly to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
    We respect your privacy and will not distribute your information.