Arlington Stadium, home of the Texas Rangers

Michael Bushnell
Publisher


Arlington Stadium bears a distinction in the major leagues of being one of only five stadiums originally built for minor league squads, then upgraded and expanded for major league use. Kansas City’s Municipal Stadium was one of those five, as was Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium, Minnesota’s Metropolitan Stadium and Seattle’s Sick’s Park.


Arlington was built in 1965 as Turnpike Stadium and was host to the Double-A Fort Worth Cats of the Texas League who moved there and upgraded to the Triple-A Dallas-Fort Worth Spurs. They played there through the 1970 season when the stadium was expanded from its original configuration of 10,000 seats to 25,000 seats. The Spurs set a number of attendance records during their tenure there, but the real purpose for the expansion was to attract a major league team to the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.


In 1972, after ten disappointing seasons in Washington D.C., the struggling Washington Senators moved to Arlington to become the Texas Rangers. They played at Arlington Stadium through the 1993 season. For the 1994 season, the Rangers moved into The Ballpark in Arlington, now Globe Life Park.


On Aug. 22, 1989, in front of a capacity crowd in Arlington Stadium, Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan struck out Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics to earn his 5,000th career strikeout, the first pitcher in major league history to achieve that number. Almost four years later to the day, Ryan tagged the White Sox’ Robin Ventura with a pitch and Ventura, in probably not the best decision of his career, decided he’d charge the mound. The ensuing result was a brawl for the ages with Ryan grabbing Ventura in a headlock and punching him on top of his head six times. Ventura, in a controversial call, was ejected but Ryan maintained his position on the mound for the remainder of the game.


The last baseball game was played in Arlington Stadium on Oct. 3, 1993, resulting in a 4-1 win by the visiting Kansas City Royals, in front of 41,039 fans. That game was also the final game for Royals Hall of Fame third baseman George Brett. The stadium was demolished in 1994, but not before the foul poles and home plate were moved to the new ballpark, along with some of the green bleachers.

Want Northeast News articles sent straight to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
Enter your email address and click on the Get Instant Access button.
We respect your privacy

Comments are closed.

  • Remember This? Protractor & Compass

    September 23rd, 2020
    by

    Cool tools for school, useful for math class and art class too. The protractor was first used by mariners to […]


    Indian Mounds, St. Paul, Minn.

    September 23rd, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher Continuing our History series of famous Indian Mounds, this week we travel north to St. Paul, Minnesota […]


    Largest prehistoric mounds located in Southern Illinois

    September 16th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher On the heels of last week’s profile of the Indian Mound located in Historic Northeast Kansas City, […]


    Remember This? Art supplies

    September 16th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor When the “father of the American Christmas card” needed art supplies for his young daughter, he started […]


    REMEMBER THIS? School boxes

    September 9th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Can you fit all your school supplies inside a cigar box? Elementary school students in the 1960’s […]


    Mound builders were region’s first residents

    September 9th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher This week we’re shifting gears and coming back to our Historic Northeast roots with a profile of […]


    Remember This? Driver’s Education Text Books

    September 2nd, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Teenagers, would you like to study a 438-page textbook before you obtained your driver’s license? This high […]


    American Made!

    September 2nd, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher Typically, our Labor Day postcard spotlights mill workers pictured in the Boiler Room of the Kelly Flour […]


  • Remember This? Commemorative Stamps

    August 26th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor The 100th Anniversary of professional baseball was commemorated with this six cent stamp issued in 1969. In […]


    The Kansas City Athletics moved to Oakland, CA

    August 26th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum opened in 1966 after almost six years of planning by the City of Oakland […]


    Remember this? Darts

    August 19th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Play baseball indoors, in any weather, with this special-designed dartboard. Added to the reverse of a standard […]


    Anaheim Stadium

    August 19th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher “Anaheim Stadium, designed to bring the fans back to the game and the game back to the […]


    Remember This? Yogi Bear

    August 12th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Hey, hey, hey, it’s Yogi! Whether Yogi is a catcher with the New York Yankees or a […]


    The house that Ruth built

    August 12th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher The original Yankee Stadium opened on April 18, 1923 and true to form, the first home run […]


    Remember This? The Lone Ranger

    August 5th, 2020
    by

    Dorri Partain Contributor Who was that masked man? The Lone Ranger began his quest of law and order as a […]


    Chiefs victory ignites riots

    July 29th, 2020
    by

    Michael Bushnell Publisher Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota opened in 1956 as a replacement facility for the minor league Minneapolis […]


  • Northeast Newscast


  • Faces Of Northeast


  • Postcard


  • retorts illustrated by bryan stalder


  • Want articles sent directly to your inbox each week? Subscribe below!
    We respect your privacy and will not distribute your information.