Planning for the future

mcc.tif

MCC – Penn Valley. Joe Seabrooks, president, MCC-Penn Valley, spoke to the 600 sixth grade students that visited his campus on Friday, May 9, as part of the Kansas City Public School’s Kids2College program. Joe Jarosz

 

By JOE JAROSZ
Northeast News
May 14, 2014

KANSAS CITY, Missouri – Is sixth grade too early to get children to start thinking about college? The Kansas City Public Schools doesn’t think so.

On Friday, May 9, around 600 sixth grade students from throughout the KCPS schools visited the campuses of two area schools – University of Missouri-Kansas City and Metropolitan Community College: Penn Valley – as part of the Kids 2 College program. The Kids 2 College program was developed, with support from the Sallie Mae Fund in partnership with the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships, as a way to expose middle-level students to the value and accessibility of a higher education.

The program includes a curriculum written by career and college experts and divided into six lessons plus the campus visit. During Friday’s field trip, KCPS students learned about the post-secondary education system, how to pay and get into college and the various careers accessible because of a college degree. The campus visit also gave the students a chance to see first hand what college life is like.

At the first stop, MCC:Penn Valley president Joe Seabrooks briefly spoke to the students, saying he went through struggles in middle school, but made a promise to himself to take advantage of every learning opportunity possible.

“You being here represents a level of energy, investment and focus that’s important for students your age,” Seabrooks said. “Identify what you’re good at and what you like to do and go from there.”

Lilly Englebrick, director of guidance and counseling services for the KCPS, said it’s important to start early when talking to students about their college opportunities. By the time the students get into high school, school official want them to start taking classes that could help them in their desired career path.

“We want them to think about the future and plant those seeds early,” Englebrick said.

Amy Bristow, sixth grade teacher at James Elementary School, said throughout much of the program, the students have been especially interested in how someone pays for college. Maria Kennedy, sixth grade teacher at Gladstone, echoed the same remarks about her students.

“It’s a big transition and they sometimes have trouble understanding the concept that you have to provide for yourself even though from grades K-12 school was provided for you,” Kennedy said.

Both teachers think middle school is a good time to get students started thinking about college. The two teachers added they’ve shared their college experiences with students, emphasizing the importance of the difference of college lifestyles from high school and the many financial aid options.

“We’ve talked a lot about money,” Bristow said. “They’re really concerned about the money aspect.”

 

Comments are closed.

  • AT&T lends a hand to help clean-up around high school

    July 14th, 2015
    by

    By Michaela Bishop Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — This August, students of Alta Vista High School will walk into a new school with many new changes.
    This past Saturday, roughly 50


    Public input sought on next KCPS Superintendent

    July 14th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Kansas City residents will soon have an opportunity to give their thoughts on the qualities they want to see in the next superintendent of Kansas


    School Board selects CFO as Interim Superintendent

    June 16th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — The Kansas City Public Schools Board of Directors have selected Allan Tunis, Chief Financial Officer of the KCPS, to serve as Interim Superintendent.
    The board


    Memories thrown to dust

    June 2nd, 2015
    by

    By Michaela Bishop Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — The demolition of Thacher Elementary has been pending for years.


    Motel Capri has been demolished

    May 27th, 2015
    by

    Capri done. The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences has completed the demolition of the


  • [Advertisement.]
  • KCDC students unveil plans for abandoned reservoir

    May 19th, 2015
    by

    By Joe Jarosz Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri – Like the one-time working water reservoir in the Northeast, the Kansas City Design Center students have been overflowing with ideas on how


    Dr. Green announces departure from KCPS

    May 19th, 2015
    by

    By Joe Jarosz Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — As Dr. R. Stephen Green choked back the tears, it was easy to see this was no easy decision.


    Lincoln Prep named Missouri’s top high school

    May 19th, 2015
    by

    By Joe Jarosz Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Lincoln College Preparatory Academy has been named the best high school in Missouri.


    Bike-to-School Day

    May 12th, 2015
    by

    Quite the hike. Dozens of Whittier Elementary students joined others across the country in biking and walking to school on Wednesday, May 6, to celebrate National Bike to School Day.


    KCPS Summer Experience means boost for urban youth

    May 5th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Studies have proven that children who don’t engage in activities over the summer lag behind when school resumes in the fall.
    That’s why the Kansas City


  • Local Weather

  • What’s Happening

    Gayety Theater once took center stage

    Northeast News Built of reinforced concrete and ornamental brick at a cost of $115,000, the Gayety Theater stood on the former site of the A.W. Armour home, one of the

    Neighborhood celebration thanks to the Salvation Army

    Neighborhood Celebration. Last Saturday, the Salvation Army opened their doors to anyone in the community by holding a Neighborhood Celebration.

    retorts illustrated bryan stalder

    retorts illustrated bryan stalder [...]