August R. Meyer leaves legacy as parks pioneer

PC-paseo-10th.jpg

meyer memorial.jpg

September 5, 2012

Dedicated on June 2, 1909, the August R. Meyer Memorial at 10th and The Paseo is the first memorial to be placed in a Kansas City park. The monument was placed four years after Meyer’s death at the age of 54.

This postcard published by the Southwest News Company of Kansas City, Mo., shows the new memorial from a vantage point on 10th Street. Built of Indiana buff limestone, the imposing memorial stands nearly 30 feet tall and measures close to 12 feet wide.

In the pedestal beneath the bronze frieze showing Meyer standing under a mighty oak with a set of binoculars and reviewing a set of blueprints, the following is carved: “In memory of August R. Meyer, first President of the Parks Commission of Kansas City. Horses and shops are man’s, but grass and flowers are God’s own handiwork. Undaunted, this man planned and toiled that dwellers in this place might ever freely taste the sweet delights of nature.”

The commission for the sculpting was given to eminent American sculptor Daniel French.

Meyer was born in St. Louis, Mo., to German immigrant parents in 1851. Educated in Europe, he moved to Kansas City in 1881 after a successful Colorado mining partnership with H.W. Tabor of the “Baby-Doe” mine. Meyer opened a smelting plant in the Argentine district that eventually employed more than 1,000 men.

Named president of the then-fledgling Kansas City Parks Commission in 1898, it was Meyer who sought out the services of noted landscape architect George Kessler to design Kansas City’s parks and boulevards system.

Meyer’s 26-room mansion located at 44th and Warwick was purchased by Howard Vanderslice after Meyer’s death and is now part of the Kansas City Art Institute. 

Comments are closed.

  • Fairyland lives on in photo postcard

    April 14th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News This week’s postcard shows the view of Fairyland Park from the top of the roller coaster in the 1930s.


    History remains bridge to the past

    April 7th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News In 1950, there were only two bridges that spanned the Missouri River to the north, offering access to downtown Kansas City.
    The old Hannibal Bridge, originally constructed in 1917,


    Main Street Theater history lives on

    March 31st, 2015
    by

    Northeast News The marquee on the Max Bernstein postcard of the Main Street Theater shows the vaudeville team of Williams and Wolfus playing, as well as Lydia Barry.
    “Williams and Wolfus”


    Fort Osage serves both past and present

    March 24th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News This week’s postcard is an early Chrome-type postcard published by James Tetrick of Kansas City showing historic Fort Osage near Sibley.


    The original Kansas City Hummer vehicle

    March 17th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News When you think of a Hummer these days, the first thing to probably come to mind is the monstrous SUV that began its life as a utility vehicle


  • Greetings from Saint Patrick

    March 10th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News Postcards such as this have long been used to convey greetings conveniently to friends and relatives afar.


    The White Company delivers innovation through history

    March 4th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News “Our standard has always been to build a car able to surmount any road conditions which might be encountered.


    Postcard shows business as usual in 1909

    February 18th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News Risqué postcards, like the one shown here, have been around for as long as postcards themselves.
    Prior to the advent of postcards as a private communication medium, those looking


    Missouri’s home-state railroad

    February 11th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News Published for the Missouri Pacific–Iron Mountain Railway, the promotional postcard shows a picturesque view as described by the caption: “Along the Missouri River for more than 100 miles


    The early days of downtown

    February 4th, 2015
    by

    Northeast News Hardly the downtown of today, this black and white lithographed postcard shows a view looking east-northeast from the Coates House Hotel at 11th Street and Broadway Boulevard.
    Published by


  • Local Weather

  • What’s Happening

    House of Cards collapse

    Joe Jarosz Northeast News April 17, 2015 KANSAS CITY, Missouri — The famous apartment complex with playing cards murals on […]

    Meeting addresses crime concerns

    Michael Bushnell Northeast News April 16, 2015 KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Protecting the community is the number one priority in […]

    Eddie Oyer taught Northeast to dance

    EDDIE B. OYER KANSAS CITY, Missouri — Mr. Eddie B. Oyer, 85, of Kansas City, Mo., passed away March 17, 2015, at home with his wife Patty and sister-in-law, Vickie by